Are Whole Eggs or Egg Whites Better For You?

Are Whole Eggs or Egg Whites Better For You?

 

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Many people (and even restaurants) claim that egg whites are the healthiest part of the egg, thereby tossing out the egg yolk. They believe that the egg yolk contains all the bad cholesterol that’s harmful to you.

It’s time to debunk this myth: The egg yolk is actually the healthiest part of the egg because it’s where all the nutrient density is highest. [1] The egg whites contain plenty of protein, but not as much as the yolk does. These are some of the nutrients that you get whenever you eat a whole boiled egg:

  1. Folate. It’s a B vitamin that is essential to fuel growth especially during pregnancy, infancy, and adolescence. [2] 2. Vitamin A. It helps maintain healthy skin, teeth, bone, and skin. It also promotes good vision, especially in low light. [3] 3. Vitamin B5. The intake of vitamin B5 has been known to rapidly heal wounds and scar tissues. [4] 4. Phosphorus. It is an essential mineral that is needed for the growth and repair of tissues and cells, and for the production of the genetic building blocks. [5] 5. Selenium. Selenium is necessary for reproduction, thyroid gland function, DNA production, and protection from free radical infection. [6] 6. Choline. In addition to its anti-inflammatory properties, choline is also necessary for the health of the cell membranes, muscle control, and memory. [1]

Along with these nutrients, eggs are also a good source of vitamin B2, vitamin B12, vitamin D, vitamin E, vitamin K, vitamin B6, calcium and zinc.

The American Heart Association has said that eating an egg everyday can absolutely be a part of your diet plan. [7] You can enjoy eggs any way you like – poached, hard-boiled, and soft-boiled – just remember not to overcook them, as the heat damages highly-perishable nutrients in the yolk.

References:

[1] Mercola, J. 2016. Are Egg Yolks Good or Bad? http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2016/02/29/egg-yolk-benefits.aspx

[2] Ware, M. 2016. Folate: Health Benefits and Recommended Intake http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/287677.php

[3] Vitamin A https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002400.htm

[4] Vitamin B5 http://www.nutri-facts.org/en_US/nutrients/vitamins/b5.html

[5] Phosphorus http://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/phosphorus

[6] Selenium https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Selenium-Consumer/